Oscar Winners List 2017

Here is the full list of winners from the 89th Academy Awards below. As expected La La Land nominated in 14 categories dominated the night picking up Best Actress, Best Director, Best Score and Best Song. Casey Affleck and Kenneth Lonnergan picked up Best Actor and Best Original Screenplay awards for Manchester By The Sea. Zootopia took Best Animated Film while The Salesman won Best Foreign Language Film. But in a truly sensational climax having announced La La Land as best picture winner it was revealed that in fact Moonlight had actually won after Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway apparently got handed the wrong envelope.

Full Details below:

Best picture

Moonlight

Best cinematography

La La Land

Best supporting actor

Mahershala Ali (Moonlight)

Best documentary

OJ Made In America

Best foreign language film

The Salesman

Best actor

Casey Affleck (Manchester By the Sea)

Best costume design

Fantastic beasts

Best score

La La Land

Best song

City of Stars (La La Land)

Best sound editing

Arrival

Best sound mixing

Hacksaw Ridge

Best documentary short

The White Helemets

Best production design

La La Land

Best original screenplay

Manchester By the Sea

Best adapted screenplay

Moonlight

Best animated feature

Zootopia

Best animated short

Piper

Best supporting actress

Viola Davis (Fences)

Best film editing

Hacksaw Ridge

Best live-action short

Sing

Best actress

Emma Stone (La La Land)

Best director

Damien Chazelle (La La Land)

Best visual effects

The Jungle Book

Best makeup and hairstyling

Suicide squad

Oscar Predictions 2017

As the 2017 Academy Awards gets ready to begin here’s our Red Carpet News TV predictions for who will be taking home the top prizes in all 24 categories at this year’s ceremony.

Best picture

La La Land

Best cinematography

La La Land

Best supporting actor

Mahershala Ali (Moonlight)

Best documentary

OJ Made In America

Best foreign language film

Toni Erdmann

Best actor

Casey Affleck (Manchester By the Sea)

Best costume design

Jackie

Best score

La La Land

Best song

City of Stars (La La Land)

Best sound editing

Hacksaw Ridge

Best sound mixing

La La Land

Best documentary short

Joe’s Violin

Best production design

La La Land

Best original screenplay

Manchester By the Sea

Best adapted screenplay

Moonlight

Best animated feature

Zootopia

Best animated short

Piper

Best supporting actress

Viola Davis (Fences)

Best film editing

La La Land

Best live-action short

Ennemis Interieurs

Best actress

Emma Stone (La La Land)

Best director

Damien Chazelle (La La Land)

Best visual effects

The Jungle Book

Best makeup and hairstyling

Star Trek Beyond

What’s On Stage Awards Winners 2017

The winners of the 17th Annual WhatsOnStage Awards have been announced. In a ceremony at the Prince of Wales Theatre, hosts Vikki Stone and Simon Lipkin announced the winners of the only major theatre awards voted for by the audience.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child was the big winner of the evening, taking home eight awards, a record number of WhatsOnStage Awards won for a play. The eighth story in the Harry Potter series took home awards for Best Actor in a Play for Jamie Parker, Best Supporting Actress in a Play for Noma Dumezweni, Best Supporting Actor in a Play for Anthony Boyle, Best New Play, Best Set Design, Best Lighting Design, Best Video Design and Best Director for John Tiffany.

In the musical categories, Half a Sixpence took home the most awards with three, including Best Actor in a Musical for Charlie Stemp, Best Supporting Actress in a Musical for Emma Williams and Best Choreography.

In the Best Play Revival category, No Man’s Land, which starred Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart, won, beating The Boys in the Band, The Deep Blue Sea and Travesties.

Billie Piper took home her second WhatsOnStage Award in three years, winning Best Actress in a Play for the Young Vic production of Yerma. Amber Riley was named as Best Actress in a Musical for her turn as Effie White in Dreamgirls.

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s new show School of Rock won Best New Musical, while Funny Girl won Best Musical Revival.

Gary Barlow’s musical The Girls – soon to officially open in the West End – took home Best Regional Production, while The Last Five Years took Best Off-West End Production. Disney’s Aladdin took home two awards, Trevor Dion Nicholas won Best Supporting Actor and Gregg Barnes won Best Costume Design.

The winners were announced in a ceremony in the West End which featured performances from a host of shows in London. Tyrone Huntley sang “Heaven on their Minds”, Ria Jones sang “As If We Never Said Goodbye”, while Gary Trainor and the company of School of Rock performed “Teacher’s Pet”. Barlow also performed the song “Scarborough” from The Girls alongside Joanna Riding. Riley also performed alongside Dreamgirls co-star Liisi LaFontaine, and the cast of Half A Sixpence sung “Flash, Bang, Wallop”. Trevor Dion Nicholas also appeared alongside Dean John-Wilson in a performance of “Somebody’s Got Your Back” from Aladdin.

Marking 50 years in theatre, Cameron Mackintosh was honoured with a special award, the Equity Award for Lifetime Achievement (So Far).

Video interviews with this years winners and VIP guests below:

The Lost City Of Z Review

The Plot

Real Life British explorer Major Percival Fawcett sets out to secure the glory he desperately needs to advance his career by undertaking a long and dangerous expedition to chart the remotest regions of the Amazon during the perilous dawn of the 20th century. While doing so he believes he may have found a mysterious ancient city, leading to a lifelong obsession and a relentless quest for discovery.

The Good

Sons of Anarchy star Charlie Hunnam delivers a leading man performance that is earnestly British and physically intense. After many years of playing Americans he reclaims his native accent without much difficulty. He also prove more than a match physical for the arduous task of surviving remote jungles, dangerous rapids and the battlefields of world war one. His Major Fawcett is a credible depiction of what it genuinely means to be a true ‘explorer’, rather just an Indiana Jones style fantasy figure.

Around Hunnam a strong supporting cast of familiar faces keep the film watchable in spite of its occasionally languid pace. As major Fawcett’s fiercely supportive but outspoken wife Sienna Miller continues to prove her talents extend well beyond a being just another pretty face.  She manages to ensure that with relatively modest screen time Major Fawcett’s family life back home remains something to yearn for and fight to return to.

Miller manages to avoid too many heavy handed clichés whilst illustrating the frustrations of being an enlightened woman during a more repressive era.  She also serves a useful narrative purpose on behalf of the audience in directly confronting Major Fawcett about his potentially selfish addiction to adventure and the glory of discovery.

Spider-Man star and BAFTA winner Tom Holland is a competent fit for Major Fawcett’s young son, caught somewhere between hero worship and frustrated abandonment for his often absent father.

Finally Robert Pattinson delivers an understated and virtually unrecognisable performance as Fawcett’s sharp shooting travel companion. Hidden beneath a rugged full beard and jungle dirt Pattinson manages to fully shed increasingly distant memories of his pretty Twilight adolescence.  The young British star has systematically built a credible dramatic reputation beyond the hysterical screaming of young adult fiction fans. While light in dialogue his performance exudes convincing wilderness weary qualities.

Perhaps most significantly the convincing comradeship between Hunnam and Pattinson’s characters is a crucial part of making Fawcett’s yearn to explore and push the limits of human survival actually make some emotional sense.

The Bad

Those anticipating or even hoping for something approximating Indiana Jones dodging snakes and poisoned darts on his way to the temple of doom will no doubt find the grim realities of actual expeditions to be considerably less fantastical and fun. Though there is undoubtedly a genuine sense of peril at times, there simply aren’t any moments of escapist joy.

During what turns out to be an ever growing series of life threatening expeditions, Fawcett often finds himself openly questioning why he persist is abandoning his wife and young children for such a seemingly foolish and almost suicidal pursuit.  Unfortunately as the film progresses it’s a question that audiences may find harder to ignore themselves.

In the shadow of world war atrocities and with the promise of a perfectly idyllic life at home it may be hard for many people to understand what really drives Fawcett to keep going back to the edge of civilization. In a modern era of google maps and sat navs it will be especially hard for younger audiences to comprehend what the lure of blank spaces on the map and the true unknown could possibly be.

The Ugly Truth

The Lost City Of Z is a reverential homages to a largely forgotten bygone spirit of exploration at a time when the world was still full of dangerous mysteries worthy of risking life and limb for. Though the film looks and feels authentic this may not satisfy audiences hoping for more fantastical or fun adventures.

Review by Russell Nelson

Travesties Review

The Plot

An elderly man Henry Carr recounts comically misremembered tales of his time as a minor British Diplomat in Zurich in 1917. In the proses he accidentally fuses faded memories of his encounters with James Joyce, Tristan Tzara and Lenin with jumbled recollections of his involvement in a moderately successful production of The Importance of Being Ernest.

The Good

Returning to the West End after many years absence, much of the philosophical and political themes of Stoppard’s Travesties remain oddly contemporary. Though set against the very specific historical backdrop of Switzerland in 1917 much of the play’s free flowing debate about the meaning of art, love and anarchy are indisputably timeless.

In the lead role as both the befuddled older Henry Carr and the spry younger version of his recollections, British thespian Tom Hollander is perfectly magnificent.  Those that perhaps know him best from his consistently scene stealing supporting work will be even more delighted to see him hold court on stage with an effortless charm and accomplished dry wit. Opening the production with a lengthy and demanding monologue he sets a perfect tone for Stoppard’s unique comedic blend of intellectualised stupidity.

Around Hollander a strong cast of gifted supporting talents inject frenetic life into each scene.  Freddie Fox is a perfect madcap foil for Hollander, playing the boundlessly anarchic founder of Dadaism Tristan Tzara. His impressively energetic performance makes sure that even those struggling to grasp the endless array of philosophical word play and early 20th century references will have much enjoy none the less.

Alongside Hollander and Fox the rest of the cast is rounded out by equally amusing performances. Peter McDonald is a fine fit for Stoppard’s parody of literary icon and compulsive rhymer James Joyce. Likewise Amy Morgan and Clare Foster provide a scintillating combination of quick wits and dancing feet as the respective love interests of Carr’s Oscar Wilde themed fantasies. Forbes Masson also does a great job of making Soviet state builder Lenin both playfully silly and sincerely sermonising by equal turns.

The combined talents of the cast make Stoppard’s demanding script work to the very best of its abilities. Whether it’s trading verbal barbs or breaking into impromptu musical numbers the production flows with ease, particular in an even livelier second act.

The Bad

The plays relentless barrage of aggressively intellectual language and complex wordplay will soon prove overwhelming for some. Tourists listening in their second language will no doubt struggle, but in truth even for native speakers Stoppard’s unashamedly frantic intellectualising demands a very high degree of attention.

At least for those that are either incapable of grasping the full meaning of Stoppard’s words or reluctant to expended the requisite effort to keep pace there’s enough frequent physical comedy and whimsical musical interludes to keep them satisfied and at least moderately entertained.

The Ugly Truth

Travesties is a unique piece of highbrow theatre expertly brought to life by a fine ensemble cast, led by Tom Hollanders note perfect performance. Entertaining and rewarding on a number of different level it’s a production which much to offer satisfying a wide range of west end crowds.

Review by Russell Nelson